Our Campaign for Strong, Effective Implementation of the AODA

Initial Proposed Employment Accessibility Standard

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Key Public Review Question:

The Committee's initial proposed standard sets out specific requirements for all organizations in Ontario with at least one employee. Six classes of organizations have been indentified to represent types and sizes of organizations that may have different compliance schedules. The Committee welcomes input on whether specific classes have the capacity to comply with specified timelines.

Contents
  1. Preface
  2. Scope
  3. Classes of obligated organizations
  4. Accessible employment policies and training
    1. General
    2. Accessible employment policy statement
    3. Accessible employment policies
    4. Employee training
  5. Recruitment, Assessment, Selection and Hiring Requirements
    1. Providing accommodation to potential employees
    2. Job information requirements
    3. Recruitment requirements
    4. Assessment and selection requirements
    5. Hiring requirements
    6. Accessible information and communications
  6. Retention Requirements
    1. Providing individual accommodation plans for employees
    2. Orientation requirements
    3. Performance management requirements
    4. Career development and advancement requirements
    5. Return to work (Non-WSIB) requirements
    6. Redeployment requirements
    7. Separation and termination requirements
    8. Emergency and public safety information requirements
    9. Accessible information and communications 19
  7. Indicators of progress
  8. Terms used in the Standard
  9. Glossary of Terms (not used in the Standard)

Schedule 1: Boards, Commissions, Authorities and Agencies

Schedule 2: Broader Public Sector


Initial Proposed Accessible Employment Standard

0 Preface

The initial proposed accessible employment standard has been developed under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA 2005). The initial proposed standard does not diminish an organization's legal obligations imposed by any other applicable legislation, including the Ontario Human Rights Code. The Ontario Human Rights Code already requires individual accommodation for persons with disabilities to the point of undue hardship.

1 Scope

The long term objective of this initial proposed employment accessibility standard is to set out policies, procedures and requirements for the prevention, identification and removal of barriers across all stages of the employment life cycle for persons with disabilities.

This initial proposed standard applies to organizations providing paid employment. Paid employment includes:

Paid employment does not include employer-employee relationships where remuneration is not provided, such as:

Organizations obligated to comply with this initial proposed standard are detailed in Clause 2 – Classes of Obligated Organizations. Organizations have compliance responsibilities for their paid employees. Compliance responsibilities for employees of independent contractors engaged by the organization are the responsibility of the independent contractor.

Organizations not obligated to comply with this initial proposed standard are:

2 Classes of obligated organizations

The following classes of organizations have obligations under this initial proposed standard:

Class A:Private sector organizations with 1-5 employees
Class B:Private sector organizations with 6-49 employees
Class C:Private sector organizations with 50-99 employees
Class D:Private sector organizations with 100-200 employees
Class E:Private sector organizations with over 200 employees
Class F:Designated public sector organizations (meaning the Legislative Assembly and the offices of persons appointed on the address of the Assembly, every ministry of the Government of Ontario, every municipality and every person or organization listed in Schedule 1 or described in Schedule 2 to this initial proposed standard)
Note: The private sector includes for profit and not-for-profit organizations.

Committee comment:

Committee members had significant debate on various approaches to defining appropriate classes, for example classes based on organizational types, sizes or capacity to implement proposed accessible employment requirements. The committee considered how many employers in Ontario would fall into each of the proposed classes in proposing Clause 2 categories. The committee invites comments on what size of organization should comply with this standard.

3 Accessible employment policies and training
3.1 General

A culture of inclusion for persons with disabilities within the work place is advanced when accessibility policies and procedures are promoted and practised throughout an organization which respects the dignity of persons with disabilities throughout the employment life cycle. By working together, employers and employees can create equal opportunities for persons with disabilities. The development of sound accommodation practices is integral to the recruitment, retention and accommodation of knowledgeable and skilled individuals. Integral to the accommodation process is the participation of employees with disabilities in the development of individual accommodation plans. Removal of attitudinal and physical barriers is the responsibility of all workplace parties. Training helps ensure that staff is aware of responsibilities and that the culture of inclusion is promoted throughout the organization.

Note: The standard adopts the definition of disability that is found in the Ontario Human Rights Code and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

3.2 Accessible employment policy statement

Organizations shall develop, adopt and maintain an accessible employment policy statement. The policy statement shall, as a minimum, include organizational commitments to:

  1. prevent, identify and remove barriers throughout the employment life cycle;
  2. the inclusive design of employment systems and processes;
  3. support persons with disabilities with accommodations during recruitment, assessment, selection and hiring stages;
  4. support persons with disabilities with individual accommodation plans;
  5. respect the privacy of information related to the accommodation of potential and existing employees;
  6. provide information and communications in accessible formats and methods; and
  7. provide disability awareness training to employees.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 1 1 1 1 1 1

Committee comments:

The committee agreed that large organizations should have an employment policy statement.

The Committee encourages the Government to provide obligated organizations with materials or tools to support implementation.

The committee seeks public input on whether very small organizations (ie, Class A) should be required to have an employment policy statement.

3.3 Accessible employment policies

Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain policies that support implementation of the commitments included in the policy statement.

Organizations shall document management responsibility for adherence to the accessible employment standard.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA 2 2 1 1 1

Committee comments:

The committee agreed that large organizations should have employment policies.

The Committee encourages the Government to provide obligated organizations with materials or tools to support implementation.

3.4 Employee training

Organizations shall provide disability awareness training as specified in the Customer Service standard for all employees.

Based on areas of responsibility, organizations shall provide additional training to employees in the following areas:

  1. accessible employment policies and procedures;
  2. what accommodations can be made;
  3. how to support disability disclosure;
  4. how to identify accommodations; and
  5. how to develop an individual accommodation plan.

Organizations shall periodically review the content of staff training to ensure it is current and relevant.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA 5 5 5 3 3
4 Recruitment, Assessment, Selection and Hiring Requirements
4.1 Providing accommodation to potential employees

4.1.1 Organizations shall explain, upon request, that accommodation shall be provided to applicants with disabilities to enable their participation in the recruitment, assessment, selection and hiring stages of the employment life cycle.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 5 5 3 3 3 3

4.1.2 Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain a procedure to ensure that accommodation shall be provided to applicants with disabilities to enable their participation in the recruitment, assessment, selection and hiring stages of the employment life cycle.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 3 3 3 3
4.2 Job information requirements

4.2.1 For recruitment purposes, organizations shall, upon request, provide the essential duties of vacant jobs.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 3a 3a 3a 3 3 3

a The Committee did not approve the "years to compliance after regulation enactment" noted above for Classes A, B and C for public review and invites comments on appropriate implementation timeframes for these classes.

4.2.2 For recruitment purposes, organizations shall document the essential duties of vacant jobs.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 3 3 3 3
4.3 Recruitment requirements

4.3.1 When recruiting, organizations shall provide information, including contact details, about the employment opportunity to organizations that provide employment services for persons with disabilities.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA 5 3 3 3 3

4.3.2 Organizations that advertise or post employment opportunities shall note in the advertisement or posting that individual accommodation shall be provided for applicants who meet required qualifications.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA 5 3 3 3 3
4.4 Assessment and selection requirements

When assessing and selecting job applicants, organizations shall:

  1. inform job applicants that job assessment and selection materials and procedures, including the application form, job testing materials, and job interview, are available in accessible formats and methods; and
  2. ensure that accommodations allow for assessment against the essential duties of the job.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 3 3 3 3
4.5 Hiring requirements

Organizations making documented job offers shall inform individuals about the organization's individual accommodation procedure.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 3 3 3 3
4.6 Accessible information and communications

Organizations recruiting employees shall, upon request, make the following employment related information or communications available using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard:

  1. Essential duties of vacant jobs;
  2. Employment opportunity information;
  3. Job advertisement or posting; and
  4. Application forms.

When an applicant is successful in reaching the assessment and selection phase of the employment life cycle, organizations shall, upon request, make the following employment related information or communications available using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard:

  1. Job testing materials;
  2. Job interview.

When an applicant is successful in reaching the hiring phase of the employment life cycle, organizations shall, upon request, make the job offer available using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard.

Committee comments:

The Committee did not have an opportunity to fully assess the Information and Communications Standards Development Committee's Initial Proposed Standard on accessible information and communications. The Committee is agreeing to refer to that SDC's proposed standard for accessible formats and methods requirements in this initial proposed standard. The Committee looks forward to reviewing the final proposed accessible information and communications standard when preparing its final proposed standard.

5 Retention Requirements
5.1 Providing individual accommodation plans for employees

Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain a procedure for the establishment of individual accommodation plans when requested by the employee. The procedure shall define:

  1. how an accommodation may be requested;
  2. how individuals requesting accommodation shall be consulted;
  3. how the privacy of accommodation plan information shall be managed and protected; and
  4. how individual accommodation plans shall be reviewed and modified.

Organizations shall communicate the individual accommodation plan procedure for the establishment of individual accommodation plans to all employees.

Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain a procedure for resolving disputes related to individual accommodation plans.

Individual accommodation plans shall:

  1. assess and accommodate an employee on an individual basis;
  2. consider input, as appropriate, from workplace, medical and/or other experts;
  3. detail the accommodations to be provided;
  4. detail timing for the provision of accommodations;
  5. include individualized emergency evacuation procedures if required; and
  6. include the decision making process used to develop the plan.

Organizations shall provide individual accommodation plans to the individual employee who requested the accommodation.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NAb NAb 3b 3 3 3

b The Committee did not approve the "years to compliance after regulation enactment" noted above for Classes A, B and C for public review and invites comments on appropriate implementation timeframes for these classes.

Committee comment:

The Committee welcomes input on the level of specificity contained in Clause 5.1. Should the clause detail components of the individual accommodation procedure or plan?

5.2 Orientation requirements

5.2.1 During new employee orientation, organizations shall provide:

  1. information regarding organizational policies and procedures that support employees with disabilities; and
  2. information on how to request an accommodation.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 5c 5c 5c 3 3 3

c The Committee did not approve the “years to compliance after regulation enactment” noted above for Classes A, B and C for public review and invites comments on appropriate implementation timeframes for these classes.

5.2.2 Organizations shall maintain documented employee orientation records.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 5 5 3 3

5.2.3 Organizations shall ensure that new employees receive orientation to the organization and training on essential job duties consistent with individual accommodation needs or plans.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 5d 5d 5d 5 3 3

d The Committee did not approve the “years to compliance after regulation enactment” noted above for Classes A, B and C for public review and invites comments on appropriate implementation timeframes for these classes.

5.3 Performance management requirements

Organizations that use performance management processes shall ensure that such processes are applied to employees with disabilities consistent with individual accommodation needs or plans.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 5 5 5 5 3 3
5.4 Career development and advancement requirements

Organizations that provide career development and advancement information to employees shall ensure that this information is provided to employees with disabilities consistent with individual accommodation needs or plans.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 5 5 5 5 3 3
5.5 Return to work (Non-WSIB) requirements

Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain a procedure for the return to work of employees who are absent from work as a result of a disability not related to a WSIB-related injury or illness.

Organizations shall document efforts made to return employees to the same or equivalent job.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NAe NAe 5e 5 3 3

e The Committee did not approve the “years to compliance after regulation enactment” noted above for Classes A, B and C for public review and invites comments on appropriate implementation timeframes for these classes.

5.6 Redeployment requirements

Where organizations have a procedure for redeployment, the procedure shall:

  1. apply to employees with disabilities;
  2. assess individual accommodation needs or plans;
  3. include consultation with the employee and/or the employee's representative upon request.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 5 5 3 3
5.7 Separation and termination requirements

Where organizations provide information on separation and termination, the information shall be provided in accessible formats or using accessible methods.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 5 5 3 3
5.8 Emergency and public safety information requirements

5.8.1 Organizations shall explain emergency and public safety information to employees with disabilities using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard. Emergency and public safety information shall include, but not be limited to:

  1. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System;
  2. workplace health and safety procedures and systems; including alarm systems;
  3. emergency evacuation procedures.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment 3 months 3 months 3 months 3 months 3 months Immediate

5.8.2 Organizations shall develop, adopt, document and maintain a procedure to make emergency and public safety information available to employees with disabilities using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard. Emergency and public safety information shall include, but not be limited to:

  1. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System;
  2. workplace health and safety procedures and systems; including alarm systems; and
  3. emergency evacuation procedures.
Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 5 5 3 3
5.9 Accessible information and communications

Organizations employing persons with disabilities shall make available the following employment related information or communications using formats or methods compliant with the Accessible Information and Communications standard:

  1. Individual accommodation plans;
  2. Employee orientation materials;
  3. If used, performance management processes;
  4. If provided, career development and advancement opportunities;
  5. Return to work procedure;
  6. If existing, redeployment procedure;
  7. Separation or termination information; and
  8. Emergency and public safety information.
6 Indicators of progress

Organizations shall identify indicators of progress towards accessible employment and collect data that measures performance against selected indicators.

Class A B C D E F
Sector Private Public
Employees 1-5 6-49 50-99 100-200 >200
Years to Compliance After Regulation Enactment NA NA 5 5 3 3

Committee comment:

The Committee notes that the proposed Clause does not prescribe indicators of progress an organization should use. The Committee welcomes comment on whether the clause should prescribe specific indicators of progress or if it should remain non-prescriptive and flexible. If the clause remains non-prescriptive, the Committee encourages the Government to consider providing guidance or tools to support implementation.

7 Terms used in the Standard

Accommodation – Where it is impossible to remove barriers without undue hardship, special arrangements must be made so that persons with disabilities can fully participate. This is what is called "accommodation." …. Accommodation will vary according to a person's unique needs. These needs must be considered, assessed, and accommodated individually (Ontario Human Rights Commission, Fact Sheet)

Develop, Adopt, Document and Maintain (in relation to policies and procedures)
Adopt – To use a pre-existing template and customize where necessary.
Develop – Produce and implement something that relates to a particular workplace that is not necessarily based upon a pre-existing template
Document – Recorded in writing or other format
Maintain – periodically review and update.

Assessment - The identification and evaluation of knowledge, skills and abilities, and other forms of qualifications or conditions (e.g., references, security check) required for employment. Assessment may include initial screening, interview, reference check, police check, psychological test (as applicable).

Barrier - anything that prevents a person with a disability from fully participating in all aspects of society because of his or her disability, including a physical barrier, an architectural barrier, an information or communications barrier, an attitudinal barrier, a technological barrier, a policy or a practice. (Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act)

Career Development and Advancement - Movement of an employee from one job to another that may be higher in pay, responsibility, and/or orga¬nizational level, usually based on merit, seniority, or a combination of both. (Human Resources Professionals Association)

Casual Employment - Casual workers are individuals who are called into work only as and when they are needed. The activity of these workers is therefore closely dependant on the level of, and fluctuation in, the workload, and they can work for only a few days or for as long as several weeks in a row. (International Labour Office Geneva; Information Sheet No. WT-15, May 2004)

Disability - means

  1. any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical co-ordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device,
  2. a condition of mental impairment or a developmental disability,
  3. a learning disability, or a dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language,
  4. a mental disorder, or
  5. an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or received under the insurance plan established under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997; (“handicap”) (AODA)

Employment Life Cycle - describes key stages of engagement between an individual and their employer (or a prospective employer). The employment life cycle includes the processes involved in designing the job, identifying the essential duties, recruiting and hiring the person to do the job, retention of the employee and termination.

For the purpose of this standard, Life Cycle means:

Essential Duties - involves a consideration of the duties necessary to achieve the actual job outcome, and the worker's ability to perform each of the tasks necessary to achieve the job outcome. (Re-employment Provisions, Determining Essential Duties, Document No. 19-04-04, WSIB)

Essential duties that are critical to fulfilling the purpose or desired outcome of a particular job. When assessing whether duties are essential, an employer can consider:

(Based on information found in Human Rights at Work, 3rd edition, Toronto; Carswell, 2008.

Inclusive Design (see also Barrier-Free Design and Universal Design)
An approach whereby designers and industry ensure that products and services address the needs of the widest possible consumer base, regardless of ability.
The design of mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, as many people as reasonably possible ... without the need for special adaptation or specialised design." British Standards Institute 2005

Inclusive design refers to design that meets the needs of people with disabilities. Examples include height adjustable desks, chairs, wheelchair friendly openings and non-invasive fluorescent lighting into the workspace.

Independent Contractors - A "contract for service", or a business relationship, is one where a person agrees to perform specific work in return for payment. In a "contract for service" relationship, the employer does not necessarily control the manner in which the work is done, or the times and places the work is performed.

Job Advertisement (external) and Job Posting (internal) - Information that describes the requirements of the job and the application process. Job advertisement is a useful tool to attract a wide range of potential applicants. Organizations may post externally through the following: i.e. newspaper advertisements, magazines, journals, job boards (Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Workopolis, Charity Village).

Job Application - Completion of the required documentation for the employer.

Job Offer - A formal employment offer that sets out the terms and conditions of the employment relationship.

Orientation and Training - The introduction of employees to their jobs, co-workers and the organization by providing them with information regarding such items as policies, procedures, company history, goals, culture and work rules, and working conditions. (Adapted from Human Resources Professionals Association)

Performance Management - The process encompassing all activities related to assessing and improving employee performance, productivity, and effectiveness with a goal of facilitating employee success.

Recruitment - The recruitment process is designed to attract a representative group of qualified job applicants to fill available job opportunities. (Human Resources and Social Development Canada)

Redeployment - The reassignment of employees to other departments or functions as an alternative to laying them off. (Human Resources Professionals Association)

Note: The objective of a redeployment policy is to facilitate employment once a specific position has been eliminated or an entire department has been transitioned or out-sourced. Such policies provide a degree of employment stability by providing opportunities for re-employment. Collective agreements frequently contain redeployment agreements.

Retention - Organizational policies and practices designed to meet the diverse needs of employees and create an environment that encourages employees to remain employed (Society of Human Resource Management)

Selection Process - Any step, combination of steps or procedure used as a basis for any employment decision, including, but not limited to, informal or casual interviews, unscored application forms, paper and pencil tests, performance tests, training programs, probationary periods and physical, education and work experience requirements, as well as the decision-making process used in determining whether or not to hire or promote. (Human Resources Professionals Association)

Selection Process - Selection determines which candidates from a group of applicants are most likely to be successful in performing the job (Human Resources and Social Development Canada)

Separation and Termination

  1. Separation from employment due to a voluntary resignation, layoff, retirement or dismissal. (Society of Human Resource Management)
  2. Termination ends the employment of an employee or group of employees. Layoff and recall, disciplinary action, and firing are employer-initiated actions in response to factors such as economic downturn, job obsolescence, poor employee performance and corporate restructuring. (Human Resources and Social Development Canada)
  3. Voluntary employee termination refers to employees leaving employment on their own volition for such reasons as the need to change jobs, better working conditions or career opportunities. (Human Resources and Social Development Canada)

Universal Design (see also Barrier-Free Design; Inclusive Design)
Universal design is an approach to the design of products, services and environments to be usable by as many people regardless of age, ability or circumstance. Universal design considerations (Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University):

Universal Design is the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. The intent of universal design is to simplify life for everyone by making products, communications, and the built environment more usable by as many people as possible at little or no extra cost. "What is Universal Design: Definition." Centre for Universal Design

Working Conditions - the factors determining the circumstances in which the worker works. These include hours of work, work organization, job content, welfare services and the measures taken to protect the occupational safety and health of the worker. (International Labour Office Geneva)

8 Glossary of Terms (not used in the Standard)

Barrier-free Design (from Committee's Glossary document – work in progress; cross-reference with Inclusive Design and Universal Design definition)

This term originally referred to design that allowed barrier-free access to buildings and public environments, e.g. though use of curb cuts, textured paving, ramped entry, wider doorways, corridors and accessible toilets. A barrier-free design feature is denoted by the wheelchair symbol. Today the term “barrier-free” design often extends to the design of a wide range of accessible products and technologies.

Barrier-free Design consists of modifying buildings or facilities so that they can be used by the physically disadvantaged or disabled. An example would be installing a ramp for wheelchairs alongside or in place of some steps. The idea of barrier free modification has largely been superseded by the concept of universal design, which seeks to design things from the outset to support easy access

Designated Internal Resource - In the corporate environment, the individual(s) responsible for developing and implementing policies and procedures to help persons with disabilities find appropriate jobs and assisting injured ill, and people with disabilities return to work. ( “The Human Resources Glossary, 2nd Edition”, WR Tracey, CRC Press, 1998)

Essential Skills - An essential skill is fundamental to carrying out the most important functions of a job. Without these skills, learned or innate, the job holder will not be able to achieve the overall job objective/s. The following definition is from Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

Fundamental skills that make it possible to learn all others. They are enabling skills that help people participate fully in the workplace and in the community. Essential skills include: Reading Text, Document Use, Numeracy, Writing, Oral Communication, Working with Others, Thinking Skills, Computer Use, and Continuous Learning (Human Resources and Social Development Canada)

Essential Qualifications – An essential qualification is a credential that is widely accepted by either employers, trade unions, professional occupational associations or regulatory bodies as necessary for an employee to competently perform a particular job.

Functional Demands – an analysis of both the physical and non-physical requirements to perform the essential duties of a job. Functional demands that include decision-making, writing and interactions, are examples of non-physical functional demands.

Individual Adaptations - The redesign of tools, machines, workstations and the work environment to an individual's needs. It may also include adjustments in work organization, work schedules, sequences of work and in breaking down work tasks to their basic elements. (International Labour Office Geneva)

Job Analysis - Job analysis is a detailed list of the duties that a particular job involves and the skills required. It indicates what the worker has to do, how he or she has to do it, why he or she has to do it, and what skill is involved in doing it. The analysis can also include facts about tools used, and machines operated. (International Labour Office Geneva). This is a process of gathering the right information to be able to complete a job description.

Medical Assessment - A post-offer, pre-employment medical assessment for accommodation purposes. At the time of the medical assessment, the person with a disability provides medical information to support any limitation of function. Medical recommendations are in the form of restrictions of activities, not duties.

Occupational Health & Safety Services - Health services which have essentially a preventive function and which are responsible for advising the employer, as well as the workers and their representatives, on the requirements for establishing and maintaining a safe and healthy working environment to facilitate optimal physical and mental health in relation to work. The OHS also provide advice on the adaptation of work to the capacities of workers in light of their physical and mental health. (International Labour Office Geneva)

Policy to Identify and Remove Barriers - The process of reviewing an organization's policies and procedures to identify and eliminate impediments throughout the employment life cycle in recruitment, selection, retention, transfer, or promotion of people with disabilities throughout the organization.

Procurement & Outsourcing - The practice of contracting with outside ven¬dors to handle specified functions on a permanent basis. (Human Resources Professionals Association)

Schedule 1: Boards, Commissions, Authorities and Agencies
  1. Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Appeal Tribunal.
  2. Agricorp.
  3. Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario.
  4. Algonquin Forestry Authority.
  5. Assessment Review Board.
  6. Board of negotiation continued under subsection 27 (1) of the Expropriations Act.
  7. Cancer Care Ontario.
  8. The Centennial Centre of Science and Technology.
  9. Child and Family Services Review Board.
  10. College Compensation and Appointments Council.
  11. Each community care access corporation as defined in section 1 of the Community Care Access Corporations Act, 2001.
  12. Consent and Capacity Board.
  13. Conservation Review Board.
  14. Criminal Injuries Compensation Board.
  15. Crown Employees Grievance Settlement Board.
  16. Custody Review Board.
  17. Deposit Insurance Corporation of Ontario.
  18. Echo: Improving Women's Health in Ontario.
  19. Education Quality and Accountability Office.
  20. Environmental Review Tribunal.
  21. Financial Services Commission of Ontario.
  22. Financial Services Tribunal.
  23. Fire Marshal's Public Fire Safety Council.
  24. Fire Safety Commission.
  25. Greater Toronto Transit Authority.
  26. Greater Toronto Transportation Authority.
  27. Health Professions Appeal and Review Board.
  28. Health Professions Regulatory Advisory Council.
  29. Health Services Appeal and Review Board.
  30. Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.
  31. Landlord and Tenant Board.
  32. Legal Aid Ontario.
  33. License Appeal Tribunal.
  34. Liquor Control Board of Ontario.
  35. Each local health integration network as defined under section 2 of the Local Health System Integration Act, 2006.
  36. McMichael Canadian Art Collection.
  37. Metropolitan Toronto Convention Centre Corporation.
  38. Niagara Escarpment Commission.
  39. Niagara Parks Commission.
  40. Normal Farm Practices Protection Board.
  41. Office of the Employer Adviser.
  42. Office of the Worker Adviser.
  43. Ontario Civilian Commission on Police Services.
  44. Ontario Clean Water Agency.
  45. Ontario Educational Communications Authority.
  46. Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation.
  47. Ontario Energy Board.
  48. Ontario Farm Products Marketing Commission.
  49. Ontario Film Review Board.
  50. Ontario Financing Authority.
  51. Ontario Food Terminal Board.
  52. Ontario French-language Educational Communications Authority.
  53. Ontario Health Quality Council.
  54. Ontario Heritage Trust.
  55. Ontario Highway Transportation Board.
  56. Ontario Human Rights Commission.
  57. Ontario Infrastructure Project Corporation.
  58. Ontario Labour Relations Board.
  59. Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation.
  60. Ontario Media Development Corporation.
  61. Ontario Mental Health Foundation.
  62. Ontario Municipal Board.
  63. Ontario Northland Transportation Commission.
  64. Ontario Parole and Earned Release Board.
  65. Ontario Pension Board.
  66. Ontario Place Corporation.
  67. Ontario Police Arbitration Commission.
  68. Ontario Racing Commission.
  69. Ontario Realty Corporation.
  70. Ontario Review Board.
  71. Ontario Securities Commission.
  72. Ontario Special Education Tribunal (English).
  73. Ontario Special Education Tribunal (French).
  74. Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation.
  75. Ontario Trillium Foundation.
  76. Ottawa Congress Centre.
  77. Owen Sound Transportation Company.
  78. Pay Equity Hearings Tribunal.
  79. Pay Equity Office.
  80. Province of Ontario Council for the Arts.
  81. Public Service Grievance Board.
  82. Royal Ontario Museum.
  83. St. Lawrence Parks Commission.
  84. Science North.
  85. Smart Systems for Health Agency.
  86. Social Assistance Review Board.
  87. Social Benefits Tribunal.
  88. Soldiers' Aid Commission.
  89. Trillium Gift of Life Network.
  90. Walkerton Clean Water Centre.
  91. Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal.
  92. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board.
Schedule 2: Broader Public Sector
  1. Every district school board as defined in section 1 of the Education Act.
  2. Every hospital as defined in section 1 of the Public Hospitals Act.
  3. Every college of applied arts and technology established under the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act, 2002.
  4. Every university in Ontario, including its affiliated and federated colleges, that receives operating grants from the Government of Ontario.
  5. Every public transportation organization in Ontario, including any municipally operated transportation services for persons with disabilities, that provides services for which a fare is charged for transporting the public by vehicles that are operated,
    1. by, for or on behalf of the Government of Ontario, a municipality, a local board of a municipality or a transit or transportation commission or authority,
    2. under an agreement between the Government of Ontario and a person, firm, corporation, or transit or transportation commission or authority, or
    3. under an agreement between a municipality and a person, firm, corporation or transit or transportation commission or authority.